tinyhousedarling:

The Tiny House Family is currently building a larger home and they’ve written a book about their experience. An Amazon reviewer called them “sell outs” for building their new and larger home, which I believe is 1500 sq ft.

I seen it as a brilliant plan! They are able to save a half of their household income and incur no debt, while building a new home.

They said that they were planning to do that from the beginning.  I definitely don’t see it as selling out since we all know that everyone has their own reasons for getting and living in a tiny house. 

So the garden didn’t quite work out last year.  >.>  But never one to give up completely, I decided to try again this year and learn from my mistakes.  I’m also going to figure out what to do about random colorful mushrooms popping up all over the place.  
Anyway, I’ve got mini window gardens going.  In the video in order of appearance, there’s carrots(Danver 1/2 long), sweet bell pepper, strawberries, cucumber, dill, and fennel.   My mom is ecstatic because some of the things she’s planted are actually still alive.  Now if I could just get her to pay closer attention then we might not lose any other plants.  

There was some squash she transplanted that didn’t make it because she was very much of the idea that you could plop them all in at once and be done with it which is exactly what I was instructing her against.

Anyways, there are backups so it’s cool.  This time around, I’m actually going to attempt some sort of structure to keep the cats and the dog out instead of a diy greenhouse with a plastic bin.  I didn’t care for it, and obviously my beans didn’t either.  But someone had to be the proverbial guinea pig on that one.

At the moment (and pretty much always) I’m open for art commissions.  (Art is literally my sole source of income outside of some stuff I’m selling at http://sugarstuff.storenvy.com and http://skreened.com/sugarpopdreams which I doubt would appeal to tiny housers.)  I’d like to be able to get some cinder blocks, containers, wire, and wood as well as some more soil and seeds, and some gloves. 

If you’re interested in art;

note me here or;

e-mail gothicsugarart   at    hellokitty.com  (remove the spaces)

http://facebook.com/gothicsugarart

http://gothicsugarart.tumblr.com

I also barter for art if you have gift cards or anything like that that I can use at places like Home Depot, Lowes, or even Walmart.  I have a more frivolous wishlist on pinterest if anyone wants to have the link, just note me here.  

tinyhouseamerica:

SCADpad Episode 1: The Big Idea

This makes me want to go there even more knowing that they’re doing this kind of stuff.
I want to go and check it out since it would be the first time I’ve been in a tiny house on wheels but it’s tomorrow and I have no idea if my e-mail would be received in time.

roseleraine:

Chalkboard Pantry Inventory
Chalkboard paint goes a long way… just buy a quart.  1) Painters tape, 2) use a brush to cut in the edges, 3) use a small foam roller in long strokes for the rest.  It takes three coats. They dried soooo fast while I was painting outside, I could go from #4 square back to #1 square right away.
After it is totally dry, “season” it by rubbing the long side of white chalk all over it. Let it sit for an hour or so… then wipe it off. That way the first thing you write on it won’t be a tattoo on it forever.
Then… empty and clean your pantry shelves, re-organize, make a list of what is on each shelf and… get creative as you make an inventory record on your new chalkboards!

roseleraine:

Chalkboard Pantry Inventory

Chalkboard paint goes a long way… just buy a quart.  1) Painters tape, 2) use a brush to cut in the edges, 3) use a small foam roller in long strokes for the rest.  It takes three coats. They dried soooo fast while I was painting outside, I could go from #4 square back to #1 square right away.

After it is totally dry, “season” it by rubbing the long side of white chalk all over it. Let it sit for an hour or so… then wipe it off. That way the first thing you write on it won’t be a tattoo on it forever.

Then… empty and clean your pantry shelves, re-organize, make a list of what is on each shelf and… get creative as you make an inventory record on your new chalkboards!

mothernaturenetwork:

About half the stuff you throw away is compostable. Here’s what can and can’t go in the pile.

allotment86:

Vegetables You Can Grow In The Shade.

Types Of Shade

It’s not easy to describe and compare types of shade but this should help you determine what you’ve got.

1. Partial or Half Shade

  • 5-6 hours of sun per day, mainly in the afternoon when the sun is strongest.
  • Garden beds that receive this same amount of sun in the mornings are considered ‘light shade’ and plants preferring half shade will not grow as large or quickly with the same amount of morning sun but they’ll still grow.

2. Dappled Shade, or Light Shade

  • This type of shade is usually created by the canopy of trees overhead.
  • Light still gets through but it’s not harsh and the total effect is less light than partial or half shade areas.

3. Open Shade, Full Shade, or Dense Shade 

  • Whether the shade is created from an obstruction like a house, or dense tree canopies overhead, these deeper shade areas are not suitable for veggies.

List of Veggies That Grow In The Shade

There is a hierarchy here, ranging from veggies like broccoli and Brussels sprouts that prefer a fair amount of sun (partial or half shade), to the salad greens (including mesclun mix) that do fine in dappled and light shade.

Afternoon sun is the strongest and preferable but you’ve got what you’ve got. Try stuff out and see how it works.

The amount of sun listed here is the minimum that will still provide a successful harvest.

5 hours of afternoon sun per day
This group includes brassicas (edible buds).

  • Broccoli
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Swiss Chard (stalks)

4-5 hours of afternoon sun per day
This groups includes many root vegetables.

  • Beans
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Celery
  • Celeriac
  • Collards
  • Pak Choy
  • Peas
  • radishes
  • swede, turnip

3-4 hours of afternoon sun per day
Edible leaves enjoy some shade and this helps prevent bolting.

  • Rocket
  • Kale
  • Lettuce
  • Mizuna
  • Spinach
  • Swiss Chard (leaves)

3 hours of afternoon sun per day

  • Culinary Herbs
  • Mustard Greens

2 hours of afternoon sun per day
There are some salad greens that do fine with minimal sun. If this is all you’ve got, try growing them and see how they do.

  • Asian Greens
  • Mesclun Mix, “assorted small, young salad leaves”.

source   Empress of Dirt.

boudiccasrevenge:

The Shelf Life of Food

View Post